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Drain on pontoon


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#1 TRB

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 02:10 AM

I have a 2002 Bennington 20 7 FS that has water in one pontoon. Are there drains on the pontoons or is there an access plug to stick a tube in from the top or nothing on these models?

#2 Toonafish

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 03:00 AM

Welcome TRB
On my 2012 24SFI you have three sections that make up one pontoon, nose cone, middle section, and a rear section, these are sectioned off so that if you puncture a pontoon only one section will take on water.

So to answer your question no. there should not be a drain to let the water out, there is a plug or should be a plug at the top of each section, this is to add air at the factory, do not remove unless absoulutely necessary.

If you have water you may check to see if you have a small puncture in that section, if it is a crack next to a weld you might want to get with your dealer to see if this is under warranty. TB might want to chime in on this one.

Hope this helps.

#3 Guest_Geewest_*

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 03:53 AM

If you can get to the plug at the top of the section that has the water in it you can remove the plug and put a small hose into the toon and start a syphon and drain the water out. They also make hand pumps that can suck the water out.

Did you crack the toon to get water in it?

#4 TRB

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 02:19 PM

I just bought the boat and I will investigate where the leak is.

I did not know about the sectioning in the pontoons. Hopefully I will find that to be true with my older model also.

Thanks very much for the help.

Tom

#5 Team Bennington

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 02:55 PM

I just bought the boat and I will investigate where the leak is.

I did not know about the sectioning in the pontoons. Hopefully I will find that to be true with my older model also.

Thanks very much for the help.

Tom

TRB, welcome to the Club. Bennington pontoons are completely chambered. You will see distinct bulkheld welds along each tube (generally 3-4, depending on the length of the tube.) If a chamber takes on water, try to determine where the leak is coming from, drain at that point (if possible), then re-weld. Leaks ocurring at weld points are easily repaired, although these are rare. Leaks ocurring from a hole in the tube take a little more finess, and these are more common! A qualified weld shop or a Bennington dealer can help you.

Since you are not the original owner of the boat, and the boat is a 2002, you have a slim chance that this boat is still under the STRUCTURAL warranty, but it's worth a shot. Did you transfer the warranty from the original owner to your name? This is required. If so, the second owner receives whatever is left of the first 10 YEARS of a LIFETIME STRUCTURAL WARRANTY to the original owner. There may be a few months left to you! If the chamber is leaking due to a structural weakness in a weld, rather than an "accident", we'll cover it.

Good luck, TB

#6 ericscher

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 04:13 PM

Piece of advice...

The most effective way to get the water out is to drill a hole on the bottom of the affected log.

Yeah, I know... that seems like bad advice.

However, a hole can be welded up. Seek out a welder that specifically has lots of experience welding aluminum. I'm not a welder personally, but I play one... wait, no... never mind, Point is, there is technique and skill involved; BUT it can be done and done properly.

You may also find that you need an air outlet to drain. You'll need a 3/8" - 1/2" hole to avoid having water tension simply cover the hole up and prevent draining, and the air inlet can be as small as 1/4".


This is all doable. HOWEVER...

You first need to know where the water came from.

If you are lucky, there will be test ports in each log that the factory used to test them in the first place. If not, your welder can put one in. Pressurize to a small amount... a pound or two above existing pressure is likely sufficient. Now listen and feel for the air leak. If the log is leaking enough to let water IN then it will also let air OUT.

If anyone smokes and you're indoors, blowing non-inhaled smoke towards the weld areas can be helpful. If you happen to have a mechanical smoker that can be handy. Your welder might have one.


The most important thing is that you CAN repair this, and while it might cost you a couple of hundred bucks by the time you're done, that is a HECK of a lot cheaper than a new log.
This is the captain. We're having a little problem with our docking sequence, so we may experience some slight turbulence and then... explode.

#7 MillerTime

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 04:24 AM

TRB, welcome to the Club. Bennington pontoons are completely chambered. You will see distinct bulkheld welds along each tube (generally 3-4, depending on the length of the tube.) If a chamber takes on water, try to determine where the leak is coming from, drain at that point (if possible), then re-weld. Leaks ocurring at weld points are easily repaired, although these are rare. Leaks ocurring from a hole in the tube take a little more finess, and these are more common! A qualified weld shop or a Bennington dealer can help you.

Since you are not the original owner of the boat, and the boat is a 2002, you have a slim chance that this boat is still under the STRUCTURAL warranty, but it's worth a shot. Did you transfer the warranty from the original owner to your name? This is required. If so, the second owner receives whatever is left of the first 10 YEARS of a LIFETIME STRUCTURAL WARRANTY to the original owner. There may be a few months left to you! If the chamber is leaking due to a structural weakness in a weld, rather than an "accident", we'll cover it.

Good luck, TB


Team Bennington: So it's a fact that the toons are not air pressurized. I have water in 2 of 3 tubes, not a lot, but water nevertheless. I'm first owner so I'm going to check on the structural warranty, but I expect that since we beach the boat often, we caused the problem. I've only discovered the water this weekend, I always thought it was the livewell or the tube side skirt/tubes holding water, but it isn't. Water is in the tubes.

#8 Team Bennington

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 02:57 PM

Team Bennington: So it's a fact that the toons are not air pressurized. I have water in 2 of 3 tubes, not a lot, but water nevertheless. I'm first owner so I'm going to check on the structural warranty, but I expect that since we beach the boat often, we caused the problem. I've only discovered the water this weekend, I always thought it was the livewell or the tube side skirt/tubes holding water, but it isn't. Water is in the tubes.


Hi Miller, tubes are pressure-tested during fabrication, but they are not "pressurized.". Please let a dealer look at the leak to see if we cam help!

#9 MillerTime

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 05:39 PM

Hi Miller, tubes are pressure-tested during fabrication, but they are not "pressurized.". Please let a dealer look at the leak to see if we cam help!


THANK YOU.




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