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How to restore the luster to faded burlwood (plastic) helm, table, cupholders?

Discussion in 'Technical Stuff' started by DaveTuner, Feb 5, 2019.

  1. DaveTuner

    DaveTuner New Member

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    The burlwood plastic trim on my 2012 R25 has taken too much Florida sun over the years. It's dull and faded. Anyone know of a paste or liquid to make it gleam again?
    I saw a tv ad for Rejunivate which gives dull wooden floors a great new look. Although it's not recommended on laminates, some have tried it anyway and gotten good results. I might take one for the team, if no proven methods exist.
     
  2. 1trotter

    1trotter Well-Known Member

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    Possibly wipe new. Try an inconspicuous area first. It worked great on my black house shutters.
     
  3. SEMPERFI8387

    SEMPERFI8387 Moderator

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    Depending on what you want to spend, take the parts to a body shop. They may be able to freshen them up with a new clear coat. Possibly shoot them while they are doing a vehicle to save some $$.
     
    lakeliving and 1trotter like this.
  4. ILLINOIS AVE

    ILLINOIS AVE Well-Known Member

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    Do you have a picture?
     
  5. basshawk84

    basshawk84 Well-Known Member

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    I use DOT 5 Silicone Brake Fluid on all of the black plastic on golf carts and vehicles. It reduces the fading and turns it back to black and lasts for several months. Just wipe it on with a rag, let it sit for a few minutes then wipe off the excess. I've also used a heat gun to restore black plastic but have never used it on wood color trim.
     
  6. the-little-B

    the-little-B Well-Known Member

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    The first method I would try is to use some rubbing compound like 3M's Perfect It III. It does wonders for oxidized paint your plastic is doing pretty much the same thing. It will be abrasive enough to "cut" the top layer of bad stuff off but leave a smooth finish when you're done. It is only a grade or two more abrasive than wax. Plus you won't be using any harsh chemicals that may react with the plastic that may ruin it completely.

    Trust me when I say this is wonderful stuff! It's about $35 for a jug but will last a long time and you will find other uses for it! When you use it , wether by hand or a small buffer , apply and start rubbing it around and it actually starts to do it's thing as it dries. When you get dust , apply some more if needed and that's all there is to it.
     
    Rick from Rocky Mount likes this.
  7. 1trotter

    1trotter Well-Known Member

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    4C15034A-9D2B-4A60-A68A-B58CEAB6644E.png
     

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