2021 Ridgeline

sandyreinauer

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FYI... RUMOR CONTROL...Honda Ridgeline in 2023 plans to offer a hybrid...And will also raise towing capacity up to 6500#

I'll probably get one
 

LaurencetheAdventurer

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I have been towing a 10k ToyHauler for years 180 miles each way up and down a steep grade with my Ford expedition. Combined with significant research hours on the mechanics of towing, I offer the following opinion. Ok, that does not make me a pro, but:

1) Stopping should have zero relationship with the tow capacity of your vehicle. You want the trailer brakes to stop the trailer, it truly is that simple. Of course if the trailer brakes go out (I had a wire come loose once, a pro for surge brakes) you have a different issue, but that should not happen. I can actually stop the trailer and car with just my trailer brakes.
2) Tow capacity is about straining the vehicle systems: transmission, engine, cooling, frame, etc. Occasional tows when not pushing speed limits and not having steep grades theoretically should increase capacity (but make sure tongie capacity is within limits, Amazon has a few tools that will measure this for you, my first few trips I had to re-pack the hauler three times moving more weight to the back, then forward to get it just right, complicated by was the fuel tank, propane, water, waste full or empty). I had my factory hitch reinforced.
3) A heavier tow vehicle will always outperform a lighter one and provide additional control. A weight distribution hitch greatly reduces this advantage, though it makes hooking up a bit harder and the tow ball assembly is heavy.

IMO the Ridgeline will be fine. Again, not a pro but when dollars do matter, finding the right solution is about understanding the variables and use.

Enjoy!!!
 

Potomacbassin’

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buy the ridge line if you like it. Then go to uhaul 2 times a yr and rent a 3/4 truck to tow your boat. Less wear and tear on your vehicle and nothing to worry about with payload/braking/etc
Agree with jb75 on renting (or borrowing) if really that infrequent, except take the $$ and upgrade the boat instead! I hear a 25' with ESP and 300 in your future...
 

BigKahuna

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buy the ridge line if you like it. Then go to uhaul 2 times a yr and rent a 3/4 truck to tow your boat. Less wear and tear on your vehicle and nothing to worry about with payload/braking/etc
He has a Suburban.....
 

george248

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He has a Suburban.....
It was unclear to me as well if he already has a Suburban or was considering one as an option to the Ridgeline. If he already has the Suburban then that is a no brainer. Use it to tow twice a year. My Ridgeline gets around 11mpg towing at 45-55mph. I'm sure it would drop even lower at interstate speeds. Not gonna save any money on fuel towing with a Ridgeline compared with a more capable tow vehicle. Also, why put that kind of wear and tear on a less capable tow vehicle.
 

Tin Diesel

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I hit the 'like' button for every post that said 'for twice a year, just rent a truck'.

Tow vehicle discussions always make me uncomfortable because I've seen them spiral out of control into vituperatve attacks... even on such staid forums as the Airstream forum.

So here's the basis for my opinion: we tow a 8500 lb Airstream and our 2575RL Bennington. We're coming up on 18 years of towing. With the frequency we tow, our choice was a no-brainer - F250 6.7L Turbo Diesel. It handles the Airstream easily and barely notices the Bennington. (we also have an F150, which handles the Bennington just fine but is too small for the Airstream).

My belief is this: have a tow vehicle sized to handle the 0.1% emergency maneuver, not the 99.9% every day towing.

Will a 'barely within limits' vehicle do the job 99.9% of the time? Probably.

But in that 0.1% occurrence that it won't, you may deeply regret the few bucks saved. Every trip made with an undersized vehicle should be counted as 'we got lucky'. And remember, it's not just your life you are putting at risk.

If twice a year was all I needed, I'd go the rental route.

One rule of thumb I've seen a lot: never exceed 80% of your rated tow capacity. The corollary is that vehicle manufacturers exaggerate their tow capacity.

Be safe...
 

BigKahuna

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I hit the 'like' button for every post that said 'for twice a year, just rent a truck'.

Tow vehicle discussions always make me uncomfortable because I've seen them spiral out of control into vituperatve attacks... even on such staid forums as the Airstream forum.

So here's the basis for my opinion: we tow a 8500 lb Airstream and our 2575RL Bennington. We're coming up on 18 years of towing. With the frequency we tow, our choice was a no-brainer - F250 6.7L Turbo Diesel. It handles the Airstream easily and barely notices the Bennington. (we also have an F150, which handles the Bennington just fine but is too small for the Airstream).

My belief is this: have a tow vehicle sized to handle the 0.1% emergency maneuver, not the 99.9% every day towing.

Will a 'barely within limits' vehicle do the job 99.9% of the time? Probably.

But in that 0.1% occurrence that it won't, you may deeply regret the few bucks saved. Every trip made with an undersized vehicle should be counted as 'we got lucky'. And remember, it's not just your life you are putting at risk.

If twice a year was all I needed, I'd go the rental route.

One rule of thumb I've seen a lot: never exceed 80% of your rated tow capacity. The corollary is that vehicle manufacturers exaggerate their tow capacity.

Be safe...
Yup agree with the 80% rule!
 

Potomacbassin’

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I hit the 'like' button for every post that said 'for twice a year, just rent a truck'.

Tow vehicle discussions always make me uncomfortable because I've seen them spiral out of control into vituperatve attacks... even on such staid forums as the Airstream forum.

So here's the basis for my opinion: we tow a 8500 lb Airstream and our 2575RL Bennington. We're coming up on 18 years of towing. With the frequency we tow, our choice was a no-brainer - F250 6.7L Turbo Diesel. It handles the Airstream easily and barely notices the Bennington. (we also have an F150, which handles the Bennington just fine but is too small for the Airstream).

My belief is this: have a tow vehicle sized to handle the 0.1% emergency maneuver, not the 99.9% every day towing.

Will a 'barely within limits' vehicle do the job 99.9% of the time? Probably.

But in that 0.1% occurrence that it won't, you may deeply regret the few bucks saved. Every trip made with an undersized vehicle should be counted as 'we got lucky'. And remember, it's not just your life you are putting at risk.

If twice a year was all I needed, I'd go the rental route.

One rule of thumb I've seen a lot: never exceed 80% of your rated tow capacity. The corollary is that vehicle manufacturers exaggerate their tow capacity.

Be safe...

This makes all the sense in the world. Electrical code (I believe) uses this in their design criteria for load on circuits, and similarly many other calculations likely have built-in capacity when life and property are at risk.

Why auto manufacturers are also not required to state towing capacity using an 80% rule is beyond me. At the very least it will stop all the ridiculous arguing on internet towing threads!
 

Remediation

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Our 22SFX with not much extra stuff in it, weighed 4,600lbs at a Cat scale, so you are close on the capacity. Having a Suburban keep our family from serious harm while towing a race car trailer. I agree with Tin Diesel, I size my tow vehicle for the .1% which has happened to me twice in the 40 years of towing.
 

Remediation

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Dodge Mirada 10 second drag car I built. Alston chassis kit, power windows, T tops. It's still in the barn. Ran the Div 3 NHRA Super Street 10.90 class for several years, did the 5 day big money bracket races in Florida 1 year. Had a blast, most drag racers are good people. Then the kids got into sports and I parked it. When we started, there were several guys that are my age now racing. I may pull it out and refresh it with modern equipment. If I do, I will get junior dragsters for the grandkids to race with us.
 

Potomacbassin’

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Thanks for sharing, never heard of a Mirada. Part of the problem was my dad was an AMC guy (he loved his Matadors). I worked with a gal whose family was deep into racing - that's all they did every weekend and how they spent all their disposable income including on a trailer that had a lift in it (stacker?). The kids even had their own dragster/rail cars!
 

Rockydock7080

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When I purchased our 22 foot Bennington, I towed it home from the dealer (60 miles) with my 2012 Ridgeline. Not a problem, but gas mileage really suffered. Since then, just short trips to the boat ramp for annual haul outs and put ins. The Ridgeline has been up to the task.
 
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