Best support for a Bennington 22-foot Tritoon with 150 HP Yamaha for my boat. need answers?

Phil Jeleniewski

New Member
Messages
3
Reaction score
3
Hello Brother Boaters,
I just purchased a 22-foot Bennington Tri-toon and the picture on the left is my bunk set-up.
The picture on the right is of a neighbor who has just two flat bunks that have served him well for over 7 years
What is the best way to go flat or aluminum-raised and do most just have two bunk support systems for saltwater?
Please advise a first-time boat owner.
Respectfully,
Phil Jeleniewski
Port Charlotte, Fl. 33981
 

Attachments

  • Bunks at Phil's.jpg
    Bunks at Phil's.jpg
    92.5 KB · Views: 31
  • Bunks at Marks.jpg
    Bunks at Marks.jpg
    70.6 KB · Views: 32
I have 3 flat boards for my tri toon. I would want the third log supported since the motor is attached to it. I would add another bunk in the middle like what is in your current setup.
 
I have 3 flat boards for my tri toon. I would want the third log supported since the motor is attached to it. I would add another bunk in the middle like what is in your current setup.
Thank You,
I'm new at this and the cost for a third bunk is $1,200.00 If I wanted flat boards (3) the cost is $1,000.00 and they told me to sell the aluminum bunks. waiting for additional threads to make a decision ( after my wife's decision)
 
Your very best support is going to be three “v” bunks for a tritoon; like in your left hand picture with a center set added in. It is not necessary, but just the most supportive..

Conversely, many lifts support under the deck and the pontoons hang down. Those are fine too as the boat is designed to be lifted up that way. Sea Legs and Ultra Legs also don’t support the pontoons, but they are also fine too. So there is a lot of flexibility on this matter as confirmed by Bennington directly in the past.

All of that said, nothing is as good as supporting underneath all three pontoons.

- Do you have shallow water concerns? The “V” bunk approach on the left hand side (we had similar our first 2 seasons before switching to Sea Legs) costs you some depth compared to flat boards like in your neighbors picture on the right. If shallow seasonal water is a concern, go the flat boards and you gain about a half foot of flexibility.
- If cost savings is your number one goal, also go with the three flat bunks.
- If seasonal shallow water is not a concern AND you want to go with the best support possible (for not much more $ than the flat bunks) add the center “V” bunk to your current set up.
 
You may want to check with a fabricator. I had two walkboards made and installed for less than 1/2 price of boat lift guys. He made all the stuff needed. The walkboards are nicer than the boat lift guys too.
 
are this your brackets and boards?



Looks like to do it yourself is $750 parts + $600 in shipping to add another matching support.

If you want flat boards, it is just a 10' board with the 8" carriage bolts pointing down and a bottom plate (fabricated) with four holes to squeeze the board around the lift. Not hard and don't over think it.. Like picture below, just replace the top v bracket with the 10' board and carriage bolts (round tops). If using wood boards, you can tighten the carriage bolts where the head is sunken into the wood
.


1693315549351.png
 
Last edited:
Hello Brother Boaters,
I just purchased a 22-foot Bennington Tri-toon and the picture on the left is my bunk set-up.
The picture on the right is of a neighbor who has just two flat bunks that have served him well for over 7 years
What is the best way to go flat or aluminum-raised and do most just have two bunk support systems for saltwater?
Please advise a first-time boat owner.
Respectfully,
Phil Jeleniewski
Port Charlotte, Fl. 33981
Thank You for the excellent feedback.
 
I have the three aluminum flat bunks and they work just fine. Also if you are in tidal water and it is fairly shallow, the flat bunks work to your benefit to get in and out at a low tide.
 
Back
Top