Winter prep on 4 stroke Mec 115

dmctruby

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My owners manual is on the boat otherwise I would consult it. Anyone know off hand if the merc 115 4strokes have the oil fogging valve connection on the engine. I am going to buy some fogging spray today and assume a new engine would have that fogging valve attachment as standard fair. I also plan on draining the engine oil and lower unit and putting fresh oil in. Already have have stabil marine in the gas. I also have to run some antifreeze mix through the water intake. Storing the boat outside in New England, winter was brutal last year.
 

spinzone

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I cant answer this one but plan on spending the $175 to have my dealer do it for me. I almost always get so pissed off at myself after the 1st hour of a DIY. Why didn't I just suck it up and spend the extra cash to avoid this headache?
 

dmctruby

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They are going to fog the engine, change the engine oil, change the lower unit oil, and flush the cooling system with antifreeze for $175 ?

I cant answer this one but plan on spending the $175 to have my dealer do it for me. I almost always get so pissed off at myself after the 1st hour of a DIY. Why didn't I just suck it up and spend the extra cash to avoid this headache?
 

spinzone

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I called to find out prices last month. Oil change and fogging was all that was mentioned, so I can't confirm antifreeze in the cooling system but I would think that it is. It was a little more than $100 for the oil change and lower unit oil change the last time I had it done(June).

I scheduled my appointment for November 14th drop off.

I know that the Yammy guys on this board are saying that their oil changes are running $400. Another reason why I love my Merc!
 
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ChuckP

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$400 for an oil change!?!? Glad I too got a Merc (and a 2 stroke, LOL).
 

Toonafish

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$400 for an oil change!?!? Glad I too got a Merc (and a 2 stroke, LOL).
you guys are killing me when i here what you are spending to winterize your engines, 1 can of fogging oil $5.00 DIY very easy to do, antifreeze in engine $10.00 DIY easier than fogging engine, changing lower case oil hose and pump $10.00 to $15.00 use over and over Bass Pro, oil for lower unit 2qts $16.00 DIY easier than antifreeze, changing engine oil filter and oil $20.00 Bass Pro DIY,all this can be done in less than an hour.

get a two or three gallon trash can clear if possible $5.00 or less, go to the hardware store and purchase a valve (ball valve, faucet, something with a quick shut off make it cheap) drill a hole the size of the end of valve as close to the bottom of trash container (flat sides not a five gallon round bucket)get a nut and flat washer to fit the other end and a tube of silicon for sealent make sure your valve will accomadate a garden hose, short garden hose six foot to eight foot, (fittings on both ends)pair of muffs for engine, once you have this together (let cure 24 hours)put muffs on engine,(over intake grates lower unit) hose from muffs to bucket, fill bucket with antifreeze start engine, when engine pee's antifreeze you are finished shut off engine,DONE - lower unit, pull top and bottom screws on side of lower unit (bottom first top last)let drain, screw hose end of pump to lower screw opening on lower end screw pump on qt bottle pump until fluid comes out top hole (might take two qts)put top screw in FIRST unscrew hose from lower hole replace screw DONE - change oil (engine) remove plug drain oil, remove filter, replace filter, (smear oil on o-ring before installing)put plug back in fill with engine oil (not 2 stroke)no oil change for a two stroke,DONE - pull plugs (all) bump engine (you will need two people)with key, do not turn it over like you are trying to start it, spray each cylinder 3 to 5 second burst in each cylinder do all cylinders, replace plugs Done - you just saved $200 and you have the materials to do it again next year.

If you have an inboard you can run antifreeze same way,(pull drain plugs first then replace drain plugs then run antifreeze) lower unit oil is the same, try to get the antifreeze container higher than the muffs, set on ladder swim platform etc.I have had 6 boats in the last 20 years I have never had a problem, both inboard and outboard and I'm In Kansas, we see plenty of cold weather, I hope this helps, if you have $200 or more to spend go for it, I like the DIY
 
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goldnrod24

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Is fogging necessary on a 4 stroke? I've owned 4 stroke sterndrivers for 20 years without ever fogging.

Really?

you guys are killing me when i here what you are spending to winterize your engines, 1 can of fogging oil $5.00 DIY very easy to do, antifreeze in engine $10.00 DIY easier than fogging engine, changing lower case oil hose and pump $10.00 to $15.00 use over and over Bass Pro, oil for lower unit 2qts $16.00 DIY easier than antifreeze, changing engine oil filter and oil $20.00 Bass Pro DIY,all this can be done in less than an hour.

get a two or three gallon trash can clear if possible $5.00 or less, go to the hardware store and purchase a valve (ball valve, faucet, something with a quick shut off make it cheap) drill a hole the size of the end of valve as close to the bottom of trash container (flat sides not a five gallon round bucket)get a nut and flat washer to fit the other end and a tube of silicon for sealent make sure your valve will accomadate a garden hose, short garden hose six foot to eight foot, (fittings on both ends)pair of muffs for engine, once you have this together (let cure 24 hours)put muffs on engine,(over intake grates lower unit) hose from muffs to bucket, fill bucket with antifreeze start engine, when engine pee's antifreeze you are finished shut off engine,DONE - lower unit, pull top and bottom screws on side of lower unit (bottom first top last)let drain, screw hose end of pump to lower screw opening on lower end screw pump on qt bottle pump until fluid comes out top hole (might take two qts)put top screw in FIRST unscrew hose from lower hole replace screw DONE - change oil (engine) remove plug drain oil, remove filter, replace filter, (smear oil on o-ring before installing)put plug back in fill with engine oil (not 2 stroke)no oil change for a two stroke,DONE - pull plugs (all) bump engine (you will need two people)with key, do not turn it over like you are trying to start it, spray each cylinder 3 to 5 second burst in each cylinder do all cylinders, replace plugs Done - you just saved $200 and you have the materials to do it again next year.

If you have an inboard you can run antifreeze same way,(pull drain plugs first then replace drain plugs then run antifreeze) lower unit oil is the same, try to get the antifreeze container higher than the muffs, set on ladder swim platform etc.I have had 6 boats in the last 20 years I have never had a problem, both inboard and outboard and I'm In Kansas, we see plenty of cold weather, I hope this helps, if you have $200 or more to spend go for it, I like the DIY
 

Toonafish

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Is fogging necessary on a 4 stroke? I've owned 4 stroke sterndrivers for 20 years without ever fogging.

Really?
The reason you fog an engine is to oil the cylinders, this way when you start it in the spring your piston rings are lubricated and not rubbing on rusted cylinder walls, 2 strokes have an advantage becuse they run oil in their gas thus lubricating the cylinders.

I have been told if your engine sits longer than six months you should fog, mine usually sits for about 4 months, fogging is not a bad habit to get into, $5.00 can of fogging oil or about $800 to replace rings or more (in the thousands) for a power head(engine block)

it's up to you, its your boat and your money, I dont want to tell you no and then you have engine problems, sorry.

I will admit I do not fog my engine every year, this is a subject where you will get mixed reviews.

Please make sure you use RV antifreeze, (pink or pinkish red) this will not kill the fish when you fire it up in the spring, and will not harm the animals.
 
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spinzone

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Big Toona,

Sorry, always wanted to call someone that.

I wish I were that confident to tackle a project like this. Just reading your description my mind was thinking of all the things that will inevitably go wrong for me.

I always end up spending the $71 (your estimates) and thinking "Damn, I could have paid someone else $100 to do all this BS for me!"
 

BulldogsCadillac

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I have a Yamaha 90, and there is NO WAY it costs $400 for an oil change! Unless they have some super special oil that I don't know about!
 

spinzone

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What the Yammy guys are paying.
 
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Looneymoose

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My owners manual is on the boat otherwise I would consult it. Anyone know off hand if the merc 115 4strokes have the oil fogging valve connection on the engine. I am going to buy some fogging spray today and assume a new engine would have that fogging valve attachment as standard fair. I also plan on draining the engine oil and lower unit and putting fresh oil in. Already have have stabil marine in the gas. I also have to run some antifreeze mix through the water intake. Storing the boat outside in New England, winter was brutal last year.
Geez $400.00 Yikes. Yes, I only have a Yamaha 50 but I got my motor winterized oil & filter changed, anti freeze change lower unit, fog engine, and add Stabil Marine. Shrunk wraped my boat and stored for the season at the marina for $337.00 and I only had to pay 50% down and 50% when I pick it up in the spring. Oh and I did not even buy my boat there they are just the local Yamaha dealer.

As far as empty take, full tank, or something inbetween. I have done it all over the past 41 years boats, snowmobiles, cycles, lawn equipment, ect. I always use Stabil and Seafoam through out the year. I have to say I can not tell one method is any better than the other. The key thing is to shut off the fuel supply let the motor run out and try to restart the motor until it just will not turn over at all. Use Stabil and or Seafoam all the time.

This year I put Stabil and Yamaha Ring Free in my Yamaha outboard and I left it with about a 1/4 tank at the most. In the spring I will add fresh gas with Yamaha Ring Free and I know I will be good to go. Yamaha Ring Free was recommended buy two good friends one with a Merc and the other with a Yamaha. Nothing but glowing reports of solving fuel issues and or preventing fuel problems that they both have experianced. Yamaha Ring Free came to the rescue 100%.
 
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dmctruby

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While I am pretty handy, if I can get the boat all prepped for under $175 I would pay that....so going to talk to my dealer. I needed to ask him about shrink wrap any way. Thanks for the responses, BTW I will air on the safe side and request engine fogging as the boat will be layed up Nov 1 and might not see the water until late April.
 
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Boomers dad

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There is no need to run antifreeze into a outboard. Just store it with the motor all the way down and the water will drain out. I will put stabil in the gas tank ( full ). change oil and lower unit lube. You can fog if you want I probably will. Remove batteries and I'm ready for winter. One of the reasons I bought an outboard was so I could take the boat out on a nice winter or early spring day and not have to worry about rewinterizing :D
 

dmctruby

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With all the ethanol issues I am going to store with an empty tank after running the motor & fuel in it with stabil. Even treated gas runs the risk over months of allowing water collected to be absorded into the tank plastic. I have learned from the recent horror of leaving gas in a new Ducati with a "plastic" tank what that will do. I have had no issues with storing empty, only assurance the plastic won't deform.
 

dmctruby

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fyi, from the merc website

What should be done when storing boats with ethanol-blended fuels for extended periods?

Follow the instructions for normal storage preparation found in the Operation, Maintenance & Warranty manual. When preparing to store a boat for extended periods of two months or more, it is best to completely remove all fuel from the tank. If it is difficult or not possible to remove the fuel, maintaining a full tank of fuel with a fuel stabilizer added to provide fuel stability and corrosion protection is recommended. It is best to add the stabilizer and fuel treatment to the tank at the recommended dosage, run the engine for 10 minutes to allow the system to be cleaned, shut off the fuel valve to interrupt the fuel supply and allow the engine to run until it stops, and top off the tank until it’s full to reduce the amount of exchange with the air that might bring in condensation. Do not cap the tank vent and do not fill with fuel to the point of overflowing. Some extra space should be maintained in the tank to allow for expansion and contraction of the fuel with temperature changes. A partially full tank is not recommended because the void space above the fuel allows air movement that can bring in water through condensation as the air temperature moves up and down. This condensation could potentially become a problem.

Mercury Marine can help maintain fuel systems in storage. It contains oxidation inhibitors to reduce oxidation and gum formation, metal-chelating agents to protect metal components from corrosion, water-absorbing agents to reduce the presence of free water, and dispersants to help suspend and disperse debris. When placing the boat back in service, be sure to reopen the fuel valve to the engine.
 

archangel

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Not sure why people with a Yammy is paying high prices. I have a Yamaha 200 SHO, and to winterize it I am paying $100 to the dealer where I purchased my Bennington. Then another $850 for indoor storage for the winter season (I don't own a trailer). Also, while they are working on the boat, I am getting some warranty work completed (nothing major).

Now for the first 20 hours oil change, I did pay something around $200.00 for them to conduct the 20 hour service.
 

Toonafish

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fyi, from the merc website

What should be done when storing boats with ethanol-blended fuels for extended periods?

Follow the instructions for normal storage preparation found in the Operation, Maintenance & Warranty manual. When preparing to store a boat for extended periods of two months or more, it is best to completely remove all fuel from the tank. If it is difficult or not possible to remove the fuel, maintaining a full tank of fuel with a fuel stabilizer added to provide fuel stability and corrosion protection is recommended. It is best to add the stabilizer and fuel treatment to the tank at the recommended dosage, run the engine for 10 minutes to allow the system to be cleaned, shut off the fuel valve to interrupt the fuel supply and allow the engine to run until it stops, and top off the tank until it’s full to reduce the amount of exchange with the air that might bring in condensation. Do not cap the tank vent and do not fill with fuel to the point of overflowing. Some extra space should be maintained in the tank to allow for expansion and contraction of the fuel with temperature changes. A partially full tank is not recommended because the void space above the fuel allows air movement that can bring in water through condensation as the air temperature moves up and down. This condensation could potentially become a problem.

Mercury Marine can help maintain fuel systems in storage. It contains oxidation inhibitors to reduce oxidation and gum formation, metal-chelating agents to protect metal components from corrosion, water-absorbing agents to reduce the presence of free water, and dispersants to help suspend and disperse debris. When placing the boat back in service, be sure to reopen the fuel valve to the engine.
Boomers Dad you are correct about not needing to run antifreeze into an outboard, it will drain itself, on the other hand if your impellar decides to hold water or if you develop an air pocket and this holds back water your in trouble or B.O.A.T Break Out Another Thousand for the 10 or 15 dollars and ten minutes it takes to draw antifreeze up into the engine, i wont take the chance.

I disagree with the Merc. website about running your engine dry of fuel, one, your fuel pump will not withstand this to many times before you need to replace it, two, the o-rings rubber diaphrams etc dry out and crack through the winter, this is part of what Stabil will help with once in your fuel, this was explained to me by a Merc. Mechanic, three, the lower your fuel in your tank the more condensation you will get, thus stabil again.

The only time I have had an issue with condensation or water in fuel is with a 496 HO in a 30' Crownline sitting on a lift over water through winter, once started in the spring the fuel injectors would hit and miss until i could get a good fuel conditioner ran through it (not Stabil)thats another topic.

Again this is your boat and your money, i'm just trying to save someone a few extra dollars if possible, and headaches and heartaches in the spring. one rule of thumb outboards are more forgiving than inboards.
 
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LT1GMC

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Boomers Dad you are correct about not needing to run antifreeze into an outboard, it will drain itself, on the other hand if your impellar decides to hold water or if you develop an air pocket and this holds back water your in trouble or B.O.A.T Break Out Another Thousand for the 10 or 15 dollars and ten minutes it takes to draw antifreeze up into the engine, i wont take the chance.

I disagree with the Merc. website about running your engine dry of fuel, one, your fuel pump will not withstand this to many times before you need to replace it, two, the o-rings rubber diaphrams etc dry out and crack through the winter, this is part of what Stabil will help with once in your fuel, this was explained to me by a Merc. Mechanic, three, the lower your fuel in your tank the more condensation you will get, thus stabil again.

The only time I have had an issue with condensation or water in fuel is with a 496 HO in a 30' Crownline sitting on a lift over water through winter, once started in the spring the fuel injectors would hit and miss until i could get a good fuel conditioner ran through it (not Stabil)thats another topic.

Again this is your boat and your money, i'm just trying to save someone a few extra dollars if possible, and headaches and heartaches in the spring. one rule of thumb outboards are more forgiving than inboards.
One of the problems with the ethanol in fuel is it attacks the rubber and seals in the fuel system, that is why the recommendation to run it dry. The corrosion in the fuel systems I have seen seems to be located where the rubber in the seals touchs the aluminum of the carb body, or near steel and rubber. I have to agree with Merc, who warranties the engines and has a hugh investment in owners doing it the right way. (the way their testing has shown is best.)After all, who has more experiance than the manufacturer in what works with todays fuels?
 

goldnrod24

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I have to agree with Merc, who warranties the engines and has a hugh investment in owners doing it the right way. (the way their testing has shown is best.)After all, who has more experiance than the manufacturer in what works with todays fuels?
Seems like the influence of "CYA" has to come to play here.
 
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