Do You Prefer 3/8" or 1/2" Docking/Mooring Lines?

Tooncrazy

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Thread title says it all.

Is there any difference in the Dockmate Premium (Overton's) and Shorelne (Amazon) brands?

Thanks.
 
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JeffS

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Depends on the type of line and size of boat. A 22' pontoon will have a wind profile of a 30' sport boat. 1/2" is a great safe bet in that case. If the boat is heavy...another vote for 1/2". If braided...dressier but less stretch and tough to splice. 3 strand nylon is great for crappy piers, mottled cleats and boulders/trees on shore. It all depends on the boat and the application. I carry a full set of 1/2" braided and 1/2" 3strand plus a spool of bulk nylon general purpose 3/8" braided for whatever comes along.
 

Indian_Lake_Bum

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Tooncrazy

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Thread title says it all.

Thanks for any input.
Boat is a 24' 2275 GCW.tri-toon. Will be getting quality Braided Nylon lines.
 

JeffS

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1/2" for sure.
 

Bamaman

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I buy 50' of hollow core 3/8" rope at Walmart.  I cut it in 1/4th's.  Then I thread a 1' loop through each end of the rope inside the hollow core. 

That way, I can loop numerous ropes together if the situations arise where longer ropes are needed. 

I find a 10' length of rope at the 4 corners to be about perfect for tying off a boat.  They're not too long and not too short.
 

keithkz

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Rockie69

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1/2"
 

cwag911

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1/2"
 

RReaume

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If your tying up to other toons 3/8 will work the best. For all other applications 1/2 inch
 

MrG

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I have found that when it comes to line smaller is better. disclaimer: if we are talking about brand new lines I think the smaller of the 2 would be more then fine.

The reason I like smaller lines is because it allows you to wrap more line around the cleet. Both dock side and boat side. With the wider line your not able to get as many hitches or loops around what your tieing to. Also the size of the cleet on the dock and your boat dictate what size line gives you the best holding situation. No use going bigger on a small to medium sized cleet like what our boats have

On a related/unrelated story about thicker line:

I bought some new anchors and I went for the "mondo" anchor line. Yea it looks cool but it's no better for simple day use and total overkill to the point that I got some new thinner anchor rope. Much easier to deal with for day to day use. Doesn't soak up 1/2 the water that ends up back I the boat when you pull the anchor back in.

Also another tip. Stay away from colored anchor line. I got black and it's harder to see your line. "White is Right" it's nice to look out and see your bright white anchor line and how it's doing much Easyer then a dark black line.
 
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Scott1

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I have found that when it comes to line smaller is better. disclaimer: if we are talking about brand new lines I think the smaller of the 2 would be more then fine.

The reason I like smaller lines is because it allows you to wrap more line around the cleet. Both dock side and boat side. With the wider line your not able to get as many hitches or loops around what your tieing to. Also the size of the cleet on the dock and your boat dictate what size line gives you the best holding situation. No use going bigger on a small to medium sized cleet like what our boats have

On a related/unrelated story about thicker line:

I bought some new anchors and I went for the "mondo" anchor line. Yea it looks cool but it's no better for simple day use and total overkill to the point that I got some new thinner anchor rope. Much easier to deal with for day to day use. Doesn't soak up 1/2 the water that ends up back I the boat when you pull the anchor back in.

Also another tip. Stay away from colored anchor line. I got black and it's harder to see your line. "White is Right" it's nice to look out and see your bright white anchor line and how it's doing much Easyer then a dark black line.
Many people tie their boats to a dock overnight.  You must take into consideration the load the line can handle.  New or old, if the load of the line is not enough, it will break under rough conditions.
 

JeffS

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...And regarding more-is-better hitches on the cleat...this is actually a common misconception. The load is carried entirely by the line where it leaves the cleat. Putting extra hitches on the cleat doesn't change the load carrying capability of the line. And properly made-fast, a single 2-horn hitch won't come looae.
 

IslandNomad

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So what does everyone think of these? 

http://www.amazon.com/AIRHEAD-AHDL-4-Bungee-Dockline-Feet/dp/B0012RJTUW/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1429228268&sr=8-4&keywords=dock+line

I haven't bought lines yet, but came across these. We'd be docking a 24 footer at the marina - Bennington has the hull weight at 2,525 and the 150hp Yamaha is another 480. So call it 3,000 lbs at the dock on a medium lake (not Erie, Michigan, etc) every night. I've always used dock lines, never a pre-made solution, but I've also never had a dock space before to which I'd come back every time. 
 

JeffS

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Those are for temporary docking. Not for leaving the boat for extended periods. 

Draw and post your dock configuration please...and how your boat will sit in the slip...with the locations the cleats on the drawing of your boat as well as the location of the cleats on your dock. I'll draw how to place lines and tie so that your boat is properly secured.

There is no magic to tying off at the end of the day. The proper line and the proper tie to the dock cleat and you'll be great. There is a totally accepted right way to do it. And there are a bunch of theoretical shortcuts. Ignore the shortcuts. Go with the proper tie. And you'll be safe and secure.
 

IslandNomad

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As soon as my boat is in and my slip is assigned I'll draw it up - thanks a lot.
 

MrG

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When I was referring to "More is Better" I was referring to the amount of wraps around the Cleat.

I have yet to see a broken dock line at our marina. I would say most boats come loose because they are not tied up correctly.

Common sence should be your guide here.

Every dock has didfrent sized cleats and every lake has different conditions. Local knoldege might be a good guide ask the local marina operator if you still have questions
 

JeffS

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A single 2-horn-cleat-hitch is all that is ever needed. I've seen some amazing zig-zag, loop over loop over loop over loop over loop over wrap and wrap and wrap and wrap...

Just do one single 2-horn-cleat hitch and your line will never come undone. And I have seen lines snap. Though I have never seen a proper hitch come loose.

Here is a great little video how to do a proper cleat hitch.  

The reason to keep your cleat hitch to a minimum is just courtesy to other boaters. On your own dock, do whatever makes you happy. But on a public dock, very frequently, more than one boat will utilize a single cleat from adjacent slips. Keeping your tie to an efficient and effective minimum leaves horn available for another boater to tie to the same cleat. If that boater uses a minimal and efficient hitch on top of yours, the tie releases easily and it's easy to untie his boat, remove your line and retie your dock-neighbors boat in the same proper manner.
 

kaydano

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If 3/8ths gets a snag or starts to fray somewhere in the middle, there isn't much strength left.  You may not even know the fray is there.  1/2 inch doesn't cost much more. 
 
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