No Props

Kealani

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300 HP Mercury Verados with Joystick. No idea of top speed yet but will know within an hour of being in the water.
 

Potomacbassin’

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Drool

Still waiting for my ride, hopefully the next few weeks. I’ll make sure the dealer has done the math on correct prop and has it on hand/ordered. Thanks for the heads up!
 

Vikingstaff

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Dual Mercury Verado 300’s with the joystick? That’s one amazing set up Kealani. Color me jealous in the best way possible. ;)

Props are added separately by dealers, so that is typical. It’s a bit of an art and science, so type and size of prop can vary based on owners use and particular wants. Often takes a slight amount of trial and error if trying to dial it in for maximum performance. When not worried about that, then propping is pretty simple.

I cannot wait to see other pictures of your boat. I am sure the entire thing is pretty amazing given what you’ve shown so far. Enjoy splashing it into the water.
 

Maynard G. Krebs

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Beautiful boat. I'm sure the dealer knows what he's doing, but that looks like an awful lot of weight supported by just four stacks of wood.
 

kaydano

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Props are like tires. If you live where it snows, you might buy one set. If you're a spirited driver, a much different set. If you want a ride as smooth as possible, yet a different set. Gas mileage, another.

A boat motor can fit a range of props, but which one is up to the owner's preferences.

With a setup like yours, with twin V-rods, I'd be a little irritated by the presumptuousness of the dealer, him thinking he would know what I want. Or what I needed.

That said, he should've asked you. No car dealer forgets the tires. A boat dealer certainly shouldn't forget the prop. Or props, in your case!
 

Bill N

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Good point, but I’d be more worried about the unsupported mid span, could bow the structural components and add some unnecessary fatigue.
Not at all!
I've seen dozens of tritoons stored in the off-season on 4 blocks.
 

Potomacbassin’

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Not at all!
I've seen dozens of tritoons stored in the off-season on 4 blocks.
Does this make it right? I’ve seen lots of people do things incorrectly.

Per the Bennington website for dry storage:


5. Support and Cover

Keep the pontoons off the ground to prevent corrosion. Place blocks under the welds of the pontoons, or store the boat on its trailer.”

I see multiple welds on those logs mid-span. It may be “fine” but the manufacturer recommends additional support.
 

Bill N

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I don't see anywhere that specifies that the center tube must be supported during storage.
 

Potomacbassin’

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I don't see anywhere that specifies that the center tube must be supported during storage.
The tubes are welded from two or three segments depending on length. Bennington specifies supporting at the welds, meaning there should be blocks mid span on the log. I could see that stress from the load putting the unsupported weld at risk.
 

swiftm

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Mine is a 2 tube pontoon. I’ve always stored it on the ground with 3 styrofoam blocks on each pontoon - one at each weld. I share a scissor trailer with a neighbor. The dealer pontoons where I bought it stored all of their’s that way and suggested I could get the blocks for free at Tractor Supply - most just recycled them. I was able to do so and picked up a couple more at Lowe’s. They have always worked well.dont know about a tritoon.
 

lakeliving

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Problem with adding more in the center is you need them all to be on a level plain
 

Bill N

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Companies that sell the plastic support blocks for storing pontoons sell them in quantities of 4.
More certainly won't hurt (as long as ground is perfectly level as lakeliving noted) but 4 is adequate.
 

kaydano

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Guys. 2x300 Verados on the back. He should probably be more worried about strapping the bow down to the ground instead of supporting the center!
 

kaydano

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Just to add a thought, there's no midship lifting eye...

So, the center likely does not need to be supported if they crane/lift them from the four corners.
 

swiftm

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My ground is level but the styrofoam blocks are pretty solid but do have a LITTLE give if ground was SLIGHTLY uneven. With four it would still have to be fairly level to prevent racking corner to corner.
 
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Potomacbassin’

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I know we’re beating a dead horse here, so first, to each their own.

Some of you on this thread were on a thread years ago about someone’s cracked weld at the spot he had it up on blocks. Probably a one in a thousand event but lack of failure doesn’t mean lack of fatigue. To the point above, you have even more and more weight being added to these behemoths, and yet they keep the toon the same size and wall thickness. Continuing to bear the ever-increasing weights at only four points eventually could cause an issue. Maybe short term storage is ok, but I wouldn’t want any additional weight (ie people, snow, water, etc) in that midsection.

Carry on.
 
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