Pontoon battery storage

DelavanJoe

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Should I remove the pontoon battery during the winter or would a trickle charger be a better option?
 

2fast4u

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I like to keep a product called a battery tender they are made to keep a battery charged during storage but they do not have a enough out put to over charge the battery. I also un hook the negative cable on my boat during the winter just to be sure there is no battery current going to the electrical system on the boat.
 

Michiman

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I also use a battery tender over the winter (NOCO genius G3500). With two batteries, I just alternate every month or so. Got seven years out of my last set of batteries so I'm sold.
 

Alicedream

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I just turn my two batteries off and never have a problem in the spring.
 

lakeliving

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When in Michigan I just pulled the battery and left it in the basement all winter, didn't mess with a trickle charger and I'm on my 6th year with it.
 

JandKE

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When in Michigan I just pulled the battery and left it in the basement all winter
This is the battery strategy I use as well...pull the battery from the pontoon and waverunner and store in the basement.
 

BigKahuna

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I have done these 2 methods as far as battery maintenance over the years with success. First method was to store it in a warm utility room and charge it up every 30 days. (Did this for years) 2nd and current method is to charge it fully after taking it out of the boat and then putting it on a battery tender/maintainer until it's time to put it back in the boat in the spring. Both methods has worked for me.
 

royal4

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Winters not too bad in NC -- I just throw a small solar charger on each battery. I also go out once every month or two even in the winter for an hour or so to give the engine some exercise. 5+ years so far and batteries are still going strong, knock on wood. :^)
 

Mike31406

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We leave our two batteries on the boat. I couldn’t get them out if I wanted to. I then charge each one separately every six weeks or so. This has worked for the past two seasons. Does anyone know if I can charge both batteries at once by leaving the switch in the “two” position. I currently leave both in “off” position while I recharge each one. Thanks and Happy Thanksgiving to each of you.
 

JP10

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We leave our two batteries on the boat. I couldn’t get them out if I wanted to. I then charge each one separately every six weeks or so. This has worked for the past two seasons. Does anyone know if I can charge both batteries at once by leaving the switch in the “two” position. I currently leave both in “off” position while I recharge each one. Thanks and Happy Thanksgiving to each of you.
You do realize, that eventually you will have to get those batteries out and replace them, right?
 

Vikingstaff

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You do realize, that eventually you will have to get those batteries out and replace them, right?
Eventually when they go bad, I‘ll likely just have the dealership (who services and stores the boat for us in the off season) take care of it. Now if they were to both go bad in the midst of summer, perhaps I’d mess with them just due to how busy and backlogged our dealership gets in the summer. Luckily for us, they are very accessible should I be the one to ever services them.
 

Mike31406

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You do realize, that eventually you will have to get those batteries out and replace them, right?
Sure, when that happens I’ll just have my dealer or a relative do it. I’ve had two knee replacements and one shoulder replaced which I promptly broke about a year later. These issues coupled with a bad back limit my flexibility quit abit.
 

JP10

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Sure, when that happens I’ll just have my dealer or a relative do it. I’ve had two knee replacements and one shoulder replaced which I promptly broke about a year later. These issues coupled with a bad back limit my flexibility quit abit.
Sorry to hear that. I have 2 group 31's and it's hard on the back and knees. Keep them charged and you should be good for 5 years. Good luck
 

the-little-B

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ProMariner 2 bank charger. Easy to mount and connect. Turn the main switch off , grab the extension cord , and plug it in. Charges , maintains , and conditions the batteries. No need to take them out unless they need replaced.
Use this in the summer as well. When you come off the water after a long day with the stereo etc running or a night run with all the disco lights going , all you need to do is plug it in and no worries if the batteries are charged up on the next trip out.
 

kaydano

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There's no right answer here in my opinion. Depends how long your storage season is and how cold it gets. Plates in the battery will experience sulfation if left discharged, overcharged, or left in high/cold temps.

Some sulfation is reversible, a lot of sulfation is not.

If you have a long storage season, your battery might be better off with a battery tender. Shorter storage season, and your battery will likely recover. Removing batteries can be a lot of work, so this is a personal decision.

Battery Tender Juniors are cheap... Use the "Plus" version for AGM batteries.
 
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BulldogsCadillac

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I had a separate on board charger for all my batteries. I plugged it in and gave them a good charge, then pulled and put in the basement. The first year I would write the voltage on a piece of tape on each battery (after they rested for a bit) and checked with my multimeter every month, they never really dropped at all over our long Canadian winter. I never needed a trickle charger. Although I did do A LOT of research on batteries and bought Northstar Thin Plate Pure Lead batteries, which say have an ability to sit for two years without needing a charge. I will say, carrying 4 of those buggers into my basement was no fun!! (75-80lbs each!)
 
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