Attaching trickle charger

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I just put the new boat - LSB23 - into heated indoor storage and want to hook up a trickle charger. The dual batteries are located in an awkward place and are directly under a support bar. I can't remove the battery covers to access the terminals. I see a positive and negative terminal connected to a black fuse box under the pull up cushion on port side stern. Can I use these to attach the trickle chargers? any ideas? Thanks
 
Like seadoorspguy said...unbolt the support bar. Then unbolt the bolts at the bottom holding the covers on the batteries. Remove the covers and it should expose the terminals. Attach to charger. (Unless I am missing something here).
 
My opinion ! Don't even bother with the Charger. Hear stories of them catching on fire. Just remove Battery cable.
 
My (lazy) annual charging procedure is this: When I pull the boat off the lift for the season I drive back to the cabin, attach the charger to positive/negative leads on the switch (set to 1+2) overnight, and drop off for storage the next day. Worked like a charm for 10 years on our last boat, and 2+ years on this one.

I also fully charge again when I pick it up, before it goes back on the lake. I use one of those NoCo battery reconditioning setups.
 
Thanks for quick response. I was looking for an easier way than having to dis-assemble the battery boxes. You say the leads are on the switch set? I will send photo. Can you tell me where? Thanks
 

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We are just putting in a three bank onboard battery charger and being done with it. One point to plug in and let it do it's thing when not in use. But we are also don't see not using the boat for more than a month or two max this year.
 
I installed a 2 batter charger, the NOCO, a bit pricey but felt it being plugged in all winter it was best to spend the premium. Took some effort to get hooked up, but now easy to plug in.
 

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The dual batteries are located in an awkward place and are directly under a support bar. I can't remove the battery covers to access the terminals.
Hang on a minute. That doesn't make sense to me that you can't remove the covers. I have a 2017 Swingback with batteries under the support bar. Mine looks identical to the picture LaurencetheAdventurer posted. It is a little tight, but I can remove the covers. I guarantee no one is removing that 4" wide support bar (the wide bar running horizontally in that picture) to remove or replace batteries.
 
Hang on a minute. That doesn't make sense to me that you can't remove the covers. I have a 2017 Swingback with batteries under the support bar. Mine looks identical to the picture LaurencetheAdventurer posted. It is a little tight, but I can remove the covers. I guarantee no one is removing that 4" wide support bar (the wide bar running horizontally in that picture) to remove or replace batteries.
2017 Swingback. Ditto Sunedog’s comments.
 
2017 Swingback. Ditto Sunedog’s comments.
So the problem for me is that the boat is already in storage and I don't have the ceiling clearance to raise the Bimini in upright position and then raise the large cushion on swing back. On my LSB 23 (2023) the batteries are under a support bar that runs north/south under the cushion. Just looking for an easier way.
 
So the problem for me is that the boat is already in storage and I don't have the ceiling clearance to raise the Bimini in upright position and then raise the large cushion on swing back. On my LSB 23 (2023) the batteries are under a support bar that runs north/south under the cushion. Just looking for an easier way.
Got ya…your predicament makes more sense now. Yes, with the SB, being able to raise up the rear platform pad/seat is essential for access. Might just be a live and learn situation at this point unless you can pull it out of storage to access it properly.
 
I appreciate allll the advice from everyone. Next spring I will either pt pig tail leads on the batteries or goo with an on board charging set-up. Using the NOCO lithium charger as a booster is also good idea. I never leave the SUV parked at airport without it!
 
I pull my batteries out for the winter, which allows me to alternate trickle charging, but I can appreciate not wanting to mess around with removing them. Might it be possible to move your battery boxes next spring to a position that’s more easily accessible?
 
Thanks for quick response. I was looking for an easier way than having to dis-assemble the battery boxes. You say the leads are on the switch set? I will send photo. Can you tell me where? Thanks
I pop alligator clips on the nuts for the red and black wires, let it charge overnight the day before storage, and I'm set.

(note: YMMV, it works for me but may not for others - don't burn your boat down)

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Well OP,
I came into this late but, here's my take on your situation. First, I have no idea on what a "support bar" is. Second, I doubt Bennington built your (and any similar models) AROUND your batteries so they can't be accessed. Sooo, I suspect that you may have to remove that support bar to gain good access to them. And third, here's what I did on our '14 Benny 25RCL for trickle charging and maintaining. I gained access to my dual batteries simply by removing a rear tail gate that hides them. But, that's our boat and the way it was built. Then, I added/installed what's called an *SAE* plug to an exterior panel right next to the tailgate. That plug goes to both batteries.

The plug is secured to the panel via 10-24 stainless steel screws and lock nuts. And, there's a weatherproof cap on that plug for when it's not in use. After that, I can simply walk up to the back of the boat and insert the opposite end of the plug from my 4A smart charger. It takes about 3 seconds to hook that charger up and walk away. The batteries are now maintained and are kept topped off. I have had ZERO worries in 3 years since I installed that plug and use it for maintaining the batteries.
Scott
 

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Well OP,
I came into this late but, here's my take on your situation. First, I have no idea on what a "support bar" is. Second, I doubt Bennington built your (and any similar models) AROUND your batteries so they can't be accessed. Sooo, I suspect that you may have to remove that support bar to gain good access to them. And third, here's what I did on our '14 Benny 25RCL for trickle charging and maintaining. I gained access to my dual batteries simply by removing a rear tail gate that hides them. But, that's our boat and the way it was built. Then, I added/installed what's called an *SAE* plug to an exterior panel right next to the tailgate. That plug goes to both batteries.

The plug is secured to the panel via 10-24 stainless steel screws and lock nuts. And, there's a weatherproof cap on that plug for when it's not in use. After that, I can simply walk up to the back of the boat and insert the opposite end of the plug from my 4A smart charger. It takes about 3 seconds to hook that charger up and walk away. The batteries are now maintained and are kept topped off. I have had ZERO worries in 3 years since I installed that plug and use it for maintaining the batteries.
Scott

I'm assuming you just make a parallel connection from the plug to the batteries? Looking to set something like this up to hook a solar panel up to trickle charge while I'm away. My issue is that I have 2 banks... one pair of starting batteries, and one/soon to be a pair of house batteries... it'd be nice to use one plug for the panels, then hook it to one or two charge controllers...
 
Trickle chargers are supposed to be safe but I too worry a little about leaving them on continuously for the entire off season. I've been having good luck just leaving the battery alone. However, once or twice during winter months I'll throw the trickle charger on. It takes a full 24 to 36 hours before the light turns from red to green at which point I take it off. If I had to guess I'd say my battery is slowly going from full to 3/4 (or no less than 1/2) before I bring it back up to full and I doubt that is shortening its' life. My current battery is at least 4 years old and is still perfroming like a new one.
 
jcr159,
Well Sir, to tell you the truth, I can't remember how I wired it. I'd have to peek into that battery area (which wouldn't be hard at all since the boat is parked under a cover next to our home) and see just what and how I did the wiring. I may have just split the wires, pos and neg into two sets and sent them to each battery from the charger plug. I'll let you know.
Scott
 
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